curiosity killed the cat

but satisfaction brought it back. //

We're finding our own tonight.
we're single spies when sorrow comes
they come on battalions.
we're finding our own tonight,
a little light to keep it on, our own battalion
~ Tuesday, December 31 ~
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(Source: vintagegal)


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~ Monday, December 30 ~
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Women feel more guilt than men, not because of some weird chromosomal issue but because they have a history of being blamed for other people’s behavior. You get hit, you must have annoyed someone; you get raped, you must have excited someone; your kid is a junkie, you must have brought him up wrong.

Guilt Poisons Women by Germaine Greer  (via leadinmyfeet)

(Source: mymangotree)


85,573 notes
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~ Sunday, December 29 ~
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~ Saturday, December 28 ~
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(Source: pascalcampion)


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~ Friday, December 27 ~
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(Source: blurrily)


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(Source: tibets)


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~ Thursday, December 26 ~
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thegoddamazon:

beeftony:

justplainsomething:

adrianestpierre:

Gaston really is the most terrifying Disney villain because he could be anyone in the world.

Later he convinces the whole town to set up his wedding with the knowledge that the would-be bride would be thrown into it. Everyone finds his creepy-ass tactics as cute and “boys will be boys” esque. So yeah, he is terrifying.

Yeah, the truly scary thing about Beauty and the Beast isn’t that Gaston exists, but that society fucking loves him. People who deride the movie by saying it’s about Stockholm Syndrome are ignoring that it’s actually about the various ways that truly decent people get othered by society. People don’t trust the Beast because of the way he looks, which only feeds his anger issues and pushes him further away. Gaston isn’t the only one who criticizes Belle for being bookish, either; the whole town says there must be something wrong with her. And her father gets carted off to a mental asylum for being just a little eccentric.

Howard Ashman, who collaborated on the film’s score and had a huge influence on the movie’s story and themes, was a gay man who died of AIDS shortly after work on the film was completed. If you watch the film with that in mind, the message of it becomes clear. Gaston demonstrates that bullies are rewarded and beloved by society as long as they possess a certain set of characteristics, while nice people who don’t are ostracized. The love story between Belle and the Beast is about them finding solace in each other after society rejects them both.

Notice how the Beast reacts when the whole town comes for him. He’s not angry, he’s sad. He’s tired. And he almost gives up because he has nothing to live for. But then he sees that Belle has come back for him, and suddenly he does. In the original fairy tale, the Beast asks Belle to marry him every night, and the spell is broken when she accepts. In the Disney movie, he waits for her to love him, because he cannot love himself. That’s how badly being ostracized from society and told that you’re a monster all your life can fuck with your head and make you stop seeing yourself as human.

Society rewards the bullies because we’ve been brought up to believe that their victims don’t belong. That if someone doesn’t fit in, then they have to be put in their place, or destroyed. And this movie demonstrates that this line of thinking is wrong. It’s so much deeper than a standard “be yourself” message, and that’s why it’s one of my favorite Disney movies.

This is the best analysis of Beauty & the Beast I’ve seen in a long while.

(Source: thomasfinchmackee)


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~ Wednesday, December 25 ~
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invisiblelad:

life-in-neon:

iamsexuallyvoracious:

enjolrasexual:

cuttlefishculling:

forestambassador:

Player 2 is a game about conflict and healing by Lydia Neon.
Play Online
Why Try It: Example of a game that centers “exoludic” player experience (that is, interactions which take place outside of the game’s programmed rules structure); can be a difficult but helpful experience for the player in voicing feelings around unresolved interpersonal conflict.
Time: Ten minutes.
How to Play: Use the mouse to click links and the keyboard to enter information into the text fields. At any time, you can click the “esc” link at the bottom of the screen to stop playing if you need to.
More Info: Player 2 was made for the “Your Enemies Don’t Have To Die For You To Win” #CreativeConflictJam, an event where participants created games that centered alternative modes of conflict resolution. It was created in Twine, a free tool for creating hypertexts, interactive stories, and text-based games.
You can find Lydia Neon at her website or on Twitter.

this is literally amazing and incredible, and anyone who’s ever had problems articulating their negative feelings or expressing them or if you need validation or even if you just have an extra 10 minutes you NEED to play this

This is insanely cool.

I need to send a personal thank you card to ms lydia neon. 10 minutes probably actually helped more than 3 asshole therapists.

:) I’m just glad to know it helped.

This may have made my morning.

invisiblelad:

life-in-neon:

iamsexuallyvoracious:

enjolrasexual:

cuttlefishculling:

forestambassador:

Player 2 is a game about conflict and healing by Lydia Neon.

Play Online

Why Try It: Example of a game that centers “exoludic” player experience (that is, interactions which take place outside of the game’s programmed rules structure); can be a difficult but helpful experience for the player in voicing feelings around unresolved interpersonal conflict.

Time: Ten minutes.

How to Play: Use the mouse to click links and the keyboard to enter information into the text fields. At any time, you can click the “esc” link at the bottom of the screen to stop playing if you need to.

More Info: Player 2 was made for the “Your Enemies Don’t Have To Die For You To Win” #CreativeConflictJam, an event where participants created games that centered alternative modes of conflict resolution. It was created in Twinea free tool for creating hypertexts, interactive stories, and text-based games.

You can find Lydia Neon at her website or on Twitter.

this is literally amazing and incredible, and anyone who’s ever had problems articulating their negative feelings or expressing them or if you need validation or even if you just have an extra 10 minutes you NEED to play this

This is insanely cool.

I need to send a personal thank you card to ms lydia neon. 10 minutes probably actually helped more than 3 asshole therapists.

:) I’m just glad to know it helped.

This may have made my morning.


32,854 notes
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